Innovative new technique could pave the way for a new generation of flexible electronic components


One of these 2-D materials is graphene, which has a honeycomb structure of carbon atoms that is only one atom thick. Credit: University of Exeter

Researchers at the University of Exeter have developed an innovative technique that could help create the next generation of flexible electronics in everyday life.

A team of engineering experts have developed a new way to facilitate the production of van der Waals heterostructures with high-K dielectric assemblies of atomically thin two-dimensional (2D) crystalline materials.

One of these 2-D materials is graphene, which has a honeycomb structure of carbon atoms that is only one atom thick.

While the benefits of van der Waals heterostructures are well documented, their development has been limited by complicated production methods.

Today, the research team has developed a new technique that allows these structures to achieve appropriate voltage scaling, improved performance, and the potential for new added features by incorporating an oxide dielectric to. K high.

Research could pave the way for a new generation of flexible fundamental electronic components.

The research is published in the journal Scientists progress.

Dr Freddie Withers, co-author of the paper and University of Exeter, said: “Our method of integrating a laser-writable high-K dielectric into various van der Waals heterostructure devices without damaging monolayer materials. 2D Neighbors opens the door to future practical and flexible van der Waals devices such as field effect transistors, memories, photodetectors and LEDs that operate in the 1-2 volt range. “

The quest to develop smaller and smaller microelectronic devices underpinning the advancement of the global semiconductor industry – a collection of companies that includes technology and communication giants Samsung and Toshiba – has been hampered. by the effects of quantum mechanics.

This means that when the thickness of conventional insulators is reduced, the ease with which electrons can escape through films.

In order to further reduce the size of the devices, the researchers plan to replace conventional insulators with high dielectric constant (k) oxides. However, commonly used high-k oxide deposition methods are not directly compatible with 2-D materials.

The latest research describes a new method to integrate a multifunctional high K oxide at the nanoscale, only in van der Waals devices without degrading the properties of neighboring 2D materials.

This new technique enables the creation of a multitude of fundamental nanoelectronic and optoelectronic devices, including double gate graphene transistors and vertical tunnel transistors emitting and detecting light.

Dr Withers added, “The fact that we start with a layered 2D semiconductor and chemically convert it to its oxide using laser irradiation results in high quality interfaces that improve performance. device performance.

“What is particularly interesting to me is that we have found that this oxidation process of the parent HfS2 takes place under laser irradiation even when it is sandwiched between 2 neighboring 2D materials. This indicates that water must travel between interfaces for the reaction to occur. “

A high K laser writable dielectric for nanoelectronics by van der Waals is published in Scientists progress.


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More information:
N. Peimyoo et al. High-k laser writable dielectric for van der Waals nanoelectronics, Scientists progress (2019). DOI: 10.1126 / sciadv.aau0906

Provided by the University of Exeter


Quote: A new innovative technique could pave the way for a new generation of flexible electronic components (January 24, 2019) retrieved on October 9, 2021 from https://phys.org/news/2019-01-technique-pave-flexible-electronic- components. html

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